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Faculty

Shu-ju Ada Cheng

Shu-ju Ada Cheng

Visiting Associate Professor

shuju.cheng@northwestern.edu

Ada Cheng is a storyteller, solo performer, show producer, educator, facilitator, and speaker based in Chicago. ​She was a tenured professor in sociology at DePaul University for 15 years from 2001 to 2016 when she resigned to pursue storytelling and performance. During her tenure at DePaul, she taught subjects on gender, sex, sexuality, masculinity, and immigration.

Helen Cho

Helen Cho

Visiting Assistant Professor

hcho@northwestern.edu
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2021

Helen Cho’s research and teaching examines the role of mass media in producing and disseminating narratives of socio-political difference, and how narratives of difference shape the way people navigate their ascribed and avowed racial and ethnic identities in U.S. and international contexts.

Michelle N. Huang

Michelle N. Huang

Assistant Professor of Asian American Studies and the Department of English

michelle.n.huang@northwestern.edu

Michelle N. Huang's research interests include Asian American literature, feminist science and technology studies, and posthumanism. Her work has appeared in Journal of Asian American Studies, Amerasia, and Twentieth-Century Literature, among other venues. 

Raymond San Diego

Raymond San Diego

Assistant Professor of Instruction in Asian American Studies

ray.sandiego@northwestern.edu

Raymond San Diego's research and teaching interests broadly focus on transnational queer and feminist Asian/American performance practice, biopolitics and disability studies, and the spatial politics of erotic visual cultures. 

Shalini Shankar

Shalini Shankar

Professor of Asian American Studies and the Department of Anthropology

sshankar@northwestern.edu
Ph.D., New York University, 2003

Shalini Shankar is a sociocultural and linguistic anthropologist. She is the author of Beeline: What Spelling Bees Reveal about the New American Childhood, Advertising Diversity: Ad Agencies and the Creation of Asian American Advertising, and Desi Land: Teen Culture, Class, and Success in Silicon Valley.

Nitasha Tamar Sharma

Nitasha Tamar Sharma

Professor of Asian American Studies and the Department of African American Studies

n-sharma@northwestern.edu
Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara, 2004

Nitasha Sharma's research interests include Black Pacific, Comparative Race Studies, Hawai‘i, Asian and Black Relations, and Afro-Asian Studies. She is the author of Hawai'i is my Haven: Race and Indigeneity in the Black Pacific, and Hip Hop Desis: South Asian Americans, Blackness, and a Global Race Consciousness.

Ji-Yeon Yuh

Ji-Yeon Yuh

Associate Professor of Asian American Studies and the Department of History

j-yuh@northwestern.edu
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1999

Ji-Yeon Yuh's research interests include Asian diasporas, race and gender, and oral history. She is the author of Beyond the Shadow of Camptown: Korean Military Brides in America. Her current projects include the Asian Diasporas Digital Archive.

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